Using Chapter 13 for All the Advantages it Gives You For Completely Resolving Your Income Tax Debts

If you can’t discharge your income tax debt through Chapter 7, or make workable payment arrangements on the remaining tax debt, then Chapter 13 can be a good solution.

 

The Previous Chapter 7 Options

The last few blogs have been about:

1) discharging (writing off) taxes through Chapter 7 “straight bankruptcy”;

2) making monthly installment payments on any taxes that can’t be discharged;

3) settling with the IRS or state on a tax you can’t pay, even in installments; and

4) paying all or part of your tax debt through an “asset” Chapter 7 case.

A consistent theme through these has been that in many situations you do not need to incur the extra expense and time of going through a three-to-five-year Chapter 13 case when these other solutions will work. But Chapter 13 IS often an excellent mechanism for resolving all your income tax debts (and usually all your other debts, too).

Chapter 13 Can Be the Easiest Way to Address Your Income Tax Debts

A Chapter 13 payment plan is often a significantly easier way to deal with income tax debts than the other alternatives because:

1. The payment amount going to the taxes are often more reasonable than the IRS/state would require. That’s because they are based on what you can actually afford, by allowing you more reasonable amounts for your expenses.

2. Your Chapter 13 case incorporates ALL your debts in one package, so that you are not forced to satisfy the IRS/state to the exclusion of other important creditors (such as your mortgage, vehicle payments, and child/spousal support). The taxes may have to wait their turn to be paid after debts that are a higher priority for you, instead of just getting paid first.  

3. Putting all your debts into one Chapter 13 package also includes all categories of your income taxes—particularly those that are being discharged and those that aren’t. This avoids the situation under Chapter 7 in which you discharge some of the taxes but then have to deal directly with the IRS/state for the taxes that were not discharged.

4. The payments going to the IRS/state can be adjusted during the course of the Chapter 13 if your circumstances change, usually without much room for their objection.

Chapter 13 Can Be a Cheaper Way to Pay Non-Discharged Taxes

It can be cheaper because:

1. In contrast to the other scenarios, under Chapter 13 usually no more interest and penalties can be added after the case is filed.

2. Often you don’t have to pay even the previously accrued penalties.

3. If you have a tax lien attached to any of your tax debts, the lien can sometimes be paid off more cheaply by paying the secured value of the lien instead of the full tax.

If your tax debt is high, and you are paying into your plan for the full five years, these savings can amount to many thousands of dollars.

Chapter 13 Is a Safer Way to Pay Non-Discharged Taxes

It’s safer because:

1. Instead of being at the mercy of the IRS/state if you are not able to make a payment, under Chapter 13 your “automatic stay” protection from all your creditors—including tax creditors—persists throughout your case. So you are not a hair-trigger away from being hit with tax liens, or levies on your wage and bank accounts.

2. You CAN lose this protection, but if you and your attorney deal with your situation proactively you can usually preserve it.

3. This protection is particularly important when your circumstances change—instead of being at the mercy of the IRS/state, your attorney can make adjustments to your Chapter 13 plan. Or if necessary, even more aggressive or creative steps may be appropriate, such as changing to a new bankruptcy case. The point is that you usually have much more control over the situation. 

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